Quote
"Nineteen things I’ve learned before I turned nineteen.
1. Always carry $5 and a lighter with you (even if you don’t smoke).
2. Ask every person you meet how their day is going. Genuinely ask with the soul intention of learning how their day is. Ask the coffee shop employee. Ask the person next to you in line at Walmart. Ask your distant friend. Ask everyone.
3. Take many photos of yourself. Take photos of yourself when you’re happy. Take photos of yourself when you’re sad. Take photos of yourself because there are millions of trees in the world, and we all look at the same sky, but there is only one of you.
4. Stay in contact with your parents. Try not to hate them. They are the reason you have the ability to feel anything at all. Try not to hate your parents.
5. Opening your skin will not set your demons free. Open your heart. Open your mind. Open your hands.
6. Nobody knows anybody completely. That’s okay.
7. Be gentle, but be aggressive. Take a stand. Nobody hears your voice if you stay silent.
8. Respect everybody. We are all humans trying to survive. We all deserve respect.
9. Wearing black will ALWAYS make you feel better about yourself.
10. Always give tips, whether it be a couple extra dollars or a piece of mind. You never know how much you could be helping someone.
11. Change is the only thing consistent in life. Do not allow that bother you. Embrace chance and move with life, whichever direction it chooses to take you.
12. Smile often. Smile at strangers. Smile at your friends. Smile when nobody is looking and you’re alone in your bedroom. Smile when somebody is rambling to you.
13. Body image means nothing. Your body is merely just a seatbelt in the car. Your body is here to protect you. You choose the direction you go, and your body will not hold you back. Only you can hold yourself back.
14. Don’t hold grudges. Don’t allow yourself to hate anybody. Forgive them. Learn to love them for the person you never got to see them to be. Believe that a beautiful human exists in that person. Wish them well.
15. Drink orange juice. Lots of it.
16. Don’t allow the opinions of others to choose your destiny. We are all simply trying to live our own life.
17. Sing all the time. Sing off key. Sing in a silly voice. Sing like you’re on stage. Sing no matter who is around. Singing is breathing for the soul. Sing.
18. Take time to think. Write your feelings down. Write letters to the people you love. Texting is overrated and not as heartfelt as a nice handwritten letter.
19. Live for yourself. Breathe for yourself. Do everything in your life for nobody but you. This is your life. This is it."

— (via maikalehua)

(Source: thinly, via unifeye)

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sweatandhappiness:

I actually really needed to read this right now.

sweatandhappiness:

I actually really needed to read this right now.

(Source: onherway, via gayfrey)

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sickpage:

Nat Urazmetova
Photoset

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Out of the Closets, Into the Streets: Gay Liberation photography 1971-1973 at Edmund Pearce Gallery, Melbourne

1. Phillip Potter. Gay is Good,1971, printed 2014

Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte
© Phillip Potter

 2. Phillip Potter. Queens, 1971

3. Ponch Hawkes.Gay Liberation march, Russell Street, Melbourne. Melbourne, 1973

4. Rennie Ellis.The Kiss, Gay Pride Week, Melbourne 1973. Silver gelatin photograph. © Rennie Ellis

5. Barbara Creed.Julian Desaily and Peter McEwan in the back of a VW Combi van, Melbourne. Melbourne, c. 1971-73. Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte. © Barbara Creed

6. John Englart.Dancing with the Hare Krishnas in the Sydney Domain. Sydney, 1973.Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte. © John Englart

7, 8 & 9. Anonymous. Graffiti on Melbourne streets.1971-73

(via gayfrey)

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(via gayfrey)

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gayfrey:

ivvvoo:

Bermuda by Christa Coleman

Someone take me backkkkkk

gayfrey:

ivvvoo:

Bermuda by Christa Coleman

Someone take me backkkkkk

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sassy-ass-cat:


okay THIS is my favorite so far

sassy-ass-cat:

okay THIS is my favorite so far

(via gayfrey)

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cinephiliabeyond:

Martin Scorsese’s statement supporting Kodak’s continued production of film stock, courtesy of our friends at The Playlist.

We have many names for what we do — cinema, movies, motion pictures. And… film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye — really, that could be easily done. Too easily.It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital informaton will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.Our industry — our filmmakers — rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love. — Martin Scorsese

cinephiliabeyond:

Martin Scorsese’s statement supporting Kodak’s continued production of film stock, courtesy of our friends at The Playlist.

We have many names for what we do — cinema, movies, motion pictures. And… film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye — really, that could be easily done. Too easily.

It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital informaton will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.

Our industry — our filmmakers — rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love. — Martin Scorsese

(via wandrlust)

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scotsmcall:

i consider 80% of my mutuals my friends even though we have never talked just to let u guys know

(via ddynoliaeth)

Photoset

littleemoon:

miss-milk:

fuckkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk.

God damn

(Source: sizvideos, via gayfrey)

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certains:

stop unfollowing me i have been nothing but gorgeous and hilarious to u all

(via ripoutmyrabbitheart)

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hungarian:

im glad dogs cant read the “no dogs allowed” signs so they dont feel sad & left out

(via mousieandco)

Quote
"I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain."

— Jonathan Carroll  (via theremina)

(Source: quotethat, via neil-gaiman)

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evalamberty:

tiny little forest spirits

evalamberty:

tiny little forest spirits

(via sosuperawesome)

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neatpotatoes:

diamoncls:

do u ever wonder if any ppl u were friends with in childhood turned out to be rly gay

i was the one who turned out really gay

(via mousieandco)